Sick of having little control around chocolate, potato chips or your other favourite food?

Ready to start untangling judgement, comparison and other draining habits around food?

Ready to make peace with food?

Welcome to the 12 Session Mindfulness-Based Eating Awareness Training (MB-EAT)

MB-EAT was developed by Jean Kristeller PhD and is a 12 session program. It blends mindful eating with mindfulness meditation practices, didactic instruction, experiential exercises and self- reflection to cultivate awareness and a more balanced and positive relationship to eating, weight and food. MB- EAT promotes self-compassion, self- awareness, and can help you put an end to mindless, stress-related and/or emotional eating.

What Will You Learn?

There are many areas that we will be focusing on in the MB-EAT course, including -

  • Cultivating the experience of mindful eating,
  • Addressing the core elements of outer wisdom for weight management,
  • Practicing mindful eating,
  • Introducing the importance of distinguishing between physical hunger and other triggers for eating,
  • Training mindful awareness of physical hunger experience,
  • Cultivating the awareness of triggers for eating,
  • Practicing non-judgemental awareness of the body,
  • Cultivating the ability to savor foods,
  • Practicing the value of attending to fullness and body satiety,
  • Enhance understanding of the link between emotions and non-hunger eating,
  • Practicing forgiveness to increase self-acceptance,
  • Reinforcing the value of exploring the chain of thoughts, feelings and choices, and
  • Reinforcing the value of exercise and mindful eating practice.

How does the 12 Session Mindfulness-Based Eating Awareness Training work?

The 12 Session Mindfulness-Based Eating Awareness Training can be taught online or in-person, individually or in a group.

Each week there will be a live session. Following is a brief outline of the 12 sessions -

“Knowing yourself is the beginning of all wisdom.” ~ Aristotle

When you join the 12 Session MB-EAT Course, you'll benefit from -

Personal Growth & (Un)Learning

As you participate and engage in the Mindfulness-Based Eating Awareness Training, you will discover additional self-awareness and evolve as a person.

Accountability & Focus

No longer will you feel like you are trying to do it all by yourself! In the Mindfulness-Based Eating Awareness Training, you will be part of a team learning and practising mindfulness in every day life. You just might find yourself more inspired to take action when you have a support system cheering you on!

Practice, Practice, Practice

The key to life is paying attention and being present. Yes, this can be challenging. On the surface, it can appear easier to bolt and run away (don't worry I have done that many, many times), however in the long run it doesn't work. This is why we are going to continually practice coming back to focus on yourself and your needs each week.

Energy & Flow

There may be days (or weeks) in your career or life when you do not have very much energy. However, when you are aligned with your own heart and soul and other people something happens and life starts to flow with ease and grace.

Encouragement & Support

You will have encouragement from Jane. When was the last time someone gave you genuine support and celebrated your successes? In Mindfulness-Based Eating Awareness Training, we want to share your experiences and learn with you!

What's included in the 12-Session Mindfulness-Based Eating Awareness Training?

I'm Ready to Join!

Who is the 12 Session Mindfulness-Based Eating Awareness Training for?

The Mindfulness-Based Eating Awareness Training (MB-EAT) is useful for a broad range of people with diverse backgrounds, ages, interests and levels of well-being. The course is suitable for any of the following:

  • Any adult who is overweight,
  • People who struggle with guilt over food decisions,
  • Adults who struggle with emotional eating, stress-eating or mindless eating,
  • People wanting to explore mindfulness and meditation in relation to relaxation, stress reduction, health and wellness,

This course is aimed at adult men and women. It is not appropriate for children.

3 Reasons to Join the 12 Session Mindfulness-Based Eating Awareness Training...

There are a number of reasons to join us in the 12 Session Mindfulness-Based Eating Awareness Training, including -

  1. The 12 Session Mindfulness-Based Eating Awareness Training is live and interactive. Jane, who is an experienced mindfulness teacher will guide you over the 12 live sessions.
  2. Draining habits (like judgement, comparison and self-sabotage) are stopping you from taking the next step in your career or life. You cannot think your way out of these draining habits, you have to find the courage and untangle them with awareness, compassion and action. In the MB-EAT Course we will be supporting you to take action and tap in to the power within.
  3. The 12 Session Mindfulness-Based Eating Awareness Training is simple (but not always easy and can be quite challenging) and is grounded in research.
I'm Ready to Join!

Feedback from Past Participants...

Jane has just completed her training to be a certified MB-EAT instructor (Dec 2018) and we will add testimonials when people complete the course (if they choose to).

Frequently Asked Questions

What are the Benefits of Mindfulness? +

Mindfulness continues to grow throughout the world. Subsequently, there has been a lot of research on mindfulness and some of the benefits of mindfulness include:

  • decreasing the symptoms of anxiety (Miller, Fletcher & Kabat-Zinn, 1995),
  • increasing a sense of empathy and spirituality (Shapiro, Schwartz & Bonner, 1998),
  • decreasing symptoms of chronic pain (Kabat-Zinn, Chapman & Salmon, 1987),
  • reduce stress levels in healthy people (Chiesa & Seretti, 2009),
  • decreasing symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder (Baxter et al, 1992),
  • increasing well-being (Brown & Ryan, 2003),
  • helpful in reducing the effects of psoriasis (Kabat-Zinn et al, 1998),
  • preventing relapse in depression (Segal et al, 2007) and drug addiction (Parks, Anderson & Marlett, 2001), and
  • decreasing stress and enhancing quality of life for those with breast and prostate cancer (Carlson L et al, 2007).

 

References - 

Baxter, L., Schwartz, J., Bergman, K., Szuba, M., Guze, B., Mazziota, J. (1992). Caudate glucose metabolic rate changes with both drug and behaviour therapy for obsessive compulsive disorder. Archives of General Psychiatry, 49(9), 681-689.

Brown, K., & Ryan, R. (2003). The Benefits of Being Present: Mindfulness and its Role in Psychological Well-beingJournal of Personality and Social Psychology, 84, 822-848.

Carlson, L., Speca, M., Faris, P., & Patel, K. (2007). One-year pre-post intervention follow-up of psychological, immune, endocrine and blood pressure outcomes of mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) in breast and prostate cancer outpatients. Brain, Behaviour, and Immunity, 21(8), 1038-1049.

Chiesa, A., &  Serretti, A. (2009). Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction for Stress Management in Healthy People: A Review and Meta-Analysis. The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, 15(5), 593-600

Kabat-Zinn, J. (2003). Mindfulness-Based Interventions in Context: Past, Present, and Future. Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice, 10, 144–156.

Kabat-Zinn. J., Chapman, A., & Salmon, P. (1987). Relationship of cognitive and somatic components of anxiety to patient preference for different relaxation techniques. Mind/Body Medicine, 2(3), 101-110.

Kabat-Zinn, J., Wheeler, E., Light, T., Skillings, A., Scharf, M., Cropley, T., Hosmer, D., & Bernhard. J. (1998). Influence of a mindfulness meditation-based stress reduction intervention on rates of skin clearing in patients with moderate to severe psoriasis undergoing phototherapy (UPA) and photochemotherapy (PUVA). Psychomatic Medicine, 60(5), 625-632.

Ludwig, D., & Kabat-Zinn, J. (2008). Mindfulness in Medicine. The Journal of the American Medical Association, 300 (11), 1350-1352.

Miller, J., Fletcher, K & Kabat-Zinn, J. (1995). Three-year follow-up and clinical implications of a mindfulness meditation-based stress reduction intervention in the treatment of anxiety disorders.General Hospital Psychiatry, 17(3), 192-200.

Parks, G., Anderson, B., & Marlett, G. (2001). Interpersonal Handbook of Alcohol Dependence and Problems. New York, USA: John Wiley.

Segal, V., Williams, M., Teasdale, D., & Kabat-Zinn, J. (2007). The Mindful Way through Depression. New York, USA: Guilford Press.

Shapiro, S., Schwartz. G., & Booner, G. (1998). Effects of mindfulness-based stress reduction on medical and premedical students. Journal of Behavioural Medicine, 21(6), 581-589.

Click here to read some other frequently asked questions on mindfulness!

How long does the 12 Session Mindfulness-Based Eating Awareness Training go for? +

The Mindfulness-Based Eating Awareness Training goes for 12 sessions. The last 2 sessions are spaced a distance a part (depending on the client).

Jane I am not very technical, can I still participate? +

Don't worry, I know technology can be challenging and frustrating, so I have made it simple and easy to participate.

Do you currently have -

  • an e-mail account? and
  • access to a reasonable internet connection?

Yes - Great! You will be able to participate in the 12 Session Mindfulness-Based Eating Awareness Training!

Is the 12 Session Mindfulness-Based Eating Awareness Training Course Coaching? +

No! The 12 Session Mindfulness-Based Eating Awareness Training is about mindfulness, not coaching. Participants in the program must take 100% responsibility for their own experience, learnings and changes in behaviour.

I don't live in Australia, can I still join the 12 Session Mindfulness-Based Eating Awareness Training? +

Of course you can. That is why we having a variety of ways you can access the 12 Session Mindfulness-Based Eating Awareness Training. 

Do I get to work individually with you Jane? +

Yes. All of the sessions are run by me and you can e-mail me between sessions.

Do you offer refunds? +

No – all sales are final on digital products and programs. We do not offer refunds.

What are the Risks Associated with Mindfulness? +

The risks of the Mindfulness includes:

Physical risks -

  • The primary risk is associated with mindful yoga.
  • Taking care of yourself is at the core of practising mindfulness.
  • If you hear guidance that you know is not healthy for your body or condition, or if you  are feeling pain, please disregard the teacher and either modify the post or rest and imagine doing the pose.
  • Explore your limits - only go to your own edge and not beyond.
  • Because we use yoga to teach mindfulness of the body, being aware of the body from moment to moment is more important in this class that in other forms of yoga where proper form is emphasised. The teacher can help you make modifications if required and it is also good to ask your doctor or physical therapist to review the postures on the practice sheets, and to make an ‘X’ through postures that are not suitable for you.

Emotional risks -

  • Feelings of sadness, anger, fear could seem stronger at the beginning because you may be paying attention in a conscious way for the first time.
  • A history of trauma, abuse or addiction to substances may heighten these reactions. Please tell your interviewer or teacher if this is true for you and we can determine together whether or not is makes sense for you to take this class.
  • You may find you make discoveries about yourself that you do not like.
  • You may be challenged and find yourself facing the unknown.

Other people in your life -

  • It may be a challenge to set aside space and time to do the practice, so it is important to request the support from your family, friends and/or co-workers.
  • You may find you change patterns of reactivity, behaviour and communication, and your family, friends and/or co-workers may be uncomfortable with the ‘new you’.
  • You may find your relationships change.

Time -

  • Finding time to make a new habit of mindfulness practice can be challenging - it is normal to have the idea that there is not enough time to practice. We sometimes find, counter-intuitively that setting aside time for practice increases the sense of spaciousness in the rest of the day.

Mindfulness continues to grow throughout the world. Subsequently, there has been a lot of research on mindfulness and some of the benefits of mindfulness include:

  • decreasing the symptoms of anxiety (Miller, Fletcher & Kabat-Zinn, 1995),
  • increasing a sense of empathy and spirituality (Shapiro, Schwartz & Bonner, 1998),
  • decreasing symptoms of chronic pain (Kabat-Zinn, Chapman & Salmon, 1987),
  • reduce stress levels in healthy people (Chiesa & Seretti, 2009),
  • decreasing symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder (Baxter et al, 1992),
  • increasing well-being (Brown & Ryan, 2003),
  • helpful in reducing the effects of psoriasis (Kabat-Zinn et al, 1998),
  • preventing relapse in depression (Segal et al, 2007) and drug addiction (Parks, Anderson & Marlett, 2001), and
  • decreasing stress and enhancing quality of life for those with breast and prostate cancer (Carlson L et al, 2007).

References -
Baxter, L., Schwartz, J., Bergman, K., Szuba, M., Guze, B., Mazziota, J. (1992). Caudate glucose metabolic rate changes with both drug and behaviour therapy for obsessive compulsive disorder. Archives of General Psychiatry, 49(9), 681-689.

Brown, K., & Ryan, R. (2003). The Benefits of Being Present: Mindfulness and its Role in Psychological Well-being. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 84, 822-848.

Carlson, L., Speca, M., Faris, P., & Patel, K. (2007). One-year pre-post intervention follow-up of psychological, immune, endocrine and blood pressure outcomes of mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) in breast and prostate cancer outpatients. Brain, Behaviour, and Immunity, 21(8), 1038-1049.

Chiesa, A., &  Serretti, A. (2009). Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction for Stress Management in Healthy People: A Review and Meta-Analysis. The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, 15(5), 593-600

Kabat-Zinn, J. (2003). Mindfulness-Based Interventions in Context: Past, Present, and Future. Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice, 10, 144–156.

Kabat-Zinn. J., Chapman, A., & Salmon, P. (1987). Relationship of cognitive and somatic components of anxiety to patient preference for different relaxation techniques. Mind/Body Medicine, 2(3), 101-110.

Kabat-Zinn, J., Wheeler, E., Light, T., Skillings, A., Scharf, M., Cropley, T., Hosmer, D., & Bernhard. J. (1998). Influence of a mindfulness meditation-based stress reduction intervention on rates of skin clearing in patients with moderate to severe psoriasis undergoing phototherapy (UPA) and photochemotherapy (PUVA). Psychomatic Medicine, 60(5), 625-632.

Ludwig, D., & Kabat-Zinn, J. (2008). Mindfulness in Medicine. The Journal of the American Medical Association, 300 (11), 1350-1352.

Miller, J., Fletcher, K & Kabat-Zinn, J. (1995). Three-year follow-up and clinical implications of a mindfulness meditation-based stress reduction intervention in the treatment of anxiety disorders. General Hospital Psychiatry, 17(3), 192-200.

Parks, G., Anderson, B., & Marlett, G. (2001). Interpersonal Handbook of Alcohol Dependence and Problems. New York, USA: John Wiley.

Segal, V., Williams, M., Teasdale, D., & Kabat-Zinn, J. (2007). The Mindful Way through Depression. New York, USA: Guilford Press.

Shapiro, S., Schwartz. G., & Booner, G. (1998). Effects of mindfulness-based stress reduction on medical and premedical students. Journal of Behavioural Medicine, 21(6), 581-589.

If you have any questions about the MBSR Course - please ask your interviewer or teacher.

Please note the above information has been adapted from the Centre for Mindfulness at the University of Massachusetts.

Is the 12 Session Mindfulness-Based Eating Awareness Training Psychotherapy or Counselling? +

No, it is not.

Past participants in the 12 Session Mindfulness-Based Eating Awareness Training have reported:

  • increased ability to relax,
  • more energy and enthusiasm for life,
  • improved self-compassion and self-acceptance,
  • greater capacity to cope with short and long term stress, and
  • a decrease in both physical and psychological symptoms.
Does doing a MB-EAT Course qualify me to teach Mindfulness? +

No it doesn't - you need to complete the training to become a teacher as well as the pre-requisites. They are all outlined here.

What currency is the MB-EAT Course offered in? +

The MB-EAT Course is offered in Australian (AUD) currency.

More Questions?? +

There are more frequently asked questions here. If your question is not there, please contact us here and we will get back to you as soon as possible.

Jane, how did you become a Mindfulness Teacher?

I have been committed and practicing mindfulness since my journey started in December 2008, when I attended my first 10-day Vipassana silent mediation retreat (I have completed 3 more 10-day silent retreats since then - December 2009, December 2011 & September 2013). In Term 4, 2009 I attended my first 8-week Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) Course. In August 2011, I attended the seven day Intensive MBSR and MBCT Teacher Training which involved 60 hours of training. The training was aimed at health professionals and educators with some knowledge and practical experience in mindfulness, and with a serious interest in bringing MBSR/CT into their lives and work. The program reflected the integration of personal experience and professional application that is central to the approach. The program offered a theoretical framework and intervention techniques for teaching MBSR/CT in clinical and community settings.

In January 2012, I attended the Teacher Development Intensive that was run by the Centre for Mindfulness at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. This eight-day residential training program/retreat included: 92 hours of direct instruction, comprehensive investigation of the underpinnings of the MBSR curriculum; extensive first-hand experience about how to teach MBSR; exploration of our identity and integrity as a teacher of MBSR; refinement of our personal meditation and yoga practice as it informs your ongoing development as an MBSR teacher; integration of key principles of the MBSR model into other mindfulness-based approaches and interventions and participation in an ongoing supportive learning community. If you would like to know more about this retreat/program - please click here. In September 2017, I completed the teacher training for Mindful Self-Compassion and then in December 2018 I completed the MB-EAT Training to become a certified instructor.

Your investment is just $895AUD.

I'm Ready to Join!

"You leave old habits behind by starting out with the thought, 'I release the need for this in my life'." ~ Dr Wayne Dyer